Keeping Your HOA Safe

safety.png

Take these simple steps to help keep your homeowners association community safe and secure.

You know the saying: the best defense is a good offense. The same applies to the safety and security of your homeowners association community. Gates, alarms, guards—these are all great measures for deterring would-be thieves and other ne’er-do-wells. But there are other ways to keep such unwanted individuals from even making that first attempt.

  1. Develop a safety and security policy. In it, create a process for an annual review of current and new security systems. Determine what types of security measures you’ll include and the budget you’ll dedicate to maintaining them.
  2. Create a safety committee. This group should be responsible for regularly walking the property to identity possible security issues—lights that need replacing, hedges that need trimming, doors or gates that don’t close properly and so on.
  3. Establish relationships with local law enforcement. Invite police officers who patrol your area to come speak at board meetings. Identify a community liaison within the police department as your main point of contact for security issues, and check in occasionally. You don’t want your first contact with law enforcement to be the result of an incident.
  4. Meet your neighbors. Developing a sense of community helps everyone. Neighbors on friendly terms are more likely to watch out for one another, report suspicious activity and be more aware of what’s going on in their community. Plan community events where neighbors can get to know one another.
  5. Remind homeowners about security. Publish a monthly safety tip in your homeowners association publication. Display crime statistics of your community in a common area. Talk about policies meant to keep your community safe, such as not providing door codes to others, keeping gates shut and not allowing strangers through security measures.

Whatever safety measures your homeowners association takes, be sure to understand your responsibility. Each state has different requirements related to an association’s duties when it comes to protecting its residents. Research the law in your state and communicate the responsibilities of the association—and the homeowners—to help keep everyone safe.

Source: Community Association Management, Realty Times
Search All Articles
Related Articles
Are You Prepared for a Blizzard?
Blizzard2017 saw some of the most extreme weather in years
5 Things To Do in a House Fire
FireAs soon as you hear a smoke detector go off, smell smoke, or see fire, get out as soon as possible.
How to Prevent House Fires
05fire-jumboThere are several things you can do to prepare and prevent disaster from striking your home.
5 Things to do if your House is Still on the Market
House-for-saleThere is a wide array of reasons why your house might not have sold yet, not all of which are in your control.

More...
Most Popular
Should You Consider Owner Financing?
OwsmHow to determine if owner financing is for you.
$8,000 First Time Home Buyers Tax Credit
Tax_returnsmDetails of the $8,000 tax credit for first-time home buyers from the 2009 stimulus package
Landscaping For Water Conservation
Landscape_thVarious methods for landscaping while considering water conservation-Planning watering, and xeriscaping are discussed.
New York Relocation Guide
NyflagsmA guide to help you get through the process of relocating or moving to New York

More...

Zip Code Profiler

Neighborhoods, Home Values, Schools, City & State Data, Sex Offender Lists, more.

Instant Home Value!