Grand Canyon National Park

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Although first afforded Federal protection in 1893 as a Forest Reserve and later as a National Monument, Grand Canyon did not achieve National Park status until 1919, three years after the creation of the National Park Service. Today Grand Canyon National Park receives close to five million visitors each year - a far cry from the annual visitation of 44,173 which the park received in 1919.

Authorization Summary:

1882 First unsuccessful attempt to establish a Grand Canyon National Park

1893 Designated a "forest reserve" by President Benjamin Harrison (Presidential Proclamation #45)

1908 Established as Grand Canyon National Monument by President Theodore Roosevelt (Presidential Proclamation #794)

1919 Designation of Grand Canyon National Park by an act of Congress on February 26 (40 Stat 1175).

1975 Grand Canyon National Park Enlargement Act an act of Congress on January 3 (88 Stat 2089) (Public Law 93-620)

1979 Designation as a World Heritage Site on October 26

Archeological Resources

The oldest human artifacts found are nearly 12,000 years old and date to the Paleo-Indian period. There has been continuous use and occupation of the park since that time.

The park has recorded over 4,800 archeological resources with an intensive survey of nearly 3% of the park area.

Archeological remains from the following culture groups are found in Grand Canyon National Park: Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Basketmaker, Ancestral Puebloan (Kayenta and Virgin branches), Cohonina, Cerbat, Pai, Zuni, Hopi, Navajo, and Euro-American.

Climate

SUMMER temperatures on the South Rim are relatively pleasant. North Rim temperatures are a few degrees cooler due to the higher elevation. Inner canyon temperatures are extreme. Daytime highs at the river often exceed 105°F. Thunderstorms frequently occur during July, August, and early September.

WINTER conditions on the South Rim can be extreme. The road into the North Rim is closed from the first heavy snow in November or early December to mid-May.

SPRING and FALL. Come prepared for a variety of conditions. Pleasant weather can change to rain or cold.

Contact Grand Canyon National Park

Write to
Grand Canyon National Park
P.O. Box 129
Grand Canyon, AZ 86023

Phone
Visitor Information
(928) 638-7888

Fax
(928) 638-7797

 

Source: National Park Service
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